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Vitamins – What You Need To Know

Vitamins are regulated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a dietary supplement. However, the FDA does not require that manufacturers of the vitamins prove safety and effectiveness before marketing a dietary supplement the way they do for a prescription medication. In addition, the FDA does not evaluate dietary supplements for the treatment of medical conditions. Due to the lack of oversight of vitamins and dietary supplements, there are many things to be careful with. Just because a product is available as over the counter, meaning no prescription is needed, it is not necessarily safe for everyone to use.

Multivitamins and specific vitamin containing products do provide benefit for certain individuals, but many healthy, non-pregnant adults get all of the nutrients they need from a well-balanced diet. Vitamin supplements are not intended for use by everyone. Some people that specifically benefit from multivitamins are vegetarians or vegans, those with poor nutritional status, and people with nonhealing wounds. Many children and adults living in Iowa do not get enough vitamin D and may require this vitamin supplement. Folic acid supplementation is beneficial for pregnancy and preconception.

Many vitamins and dietary supplements interact with prescription medications. Sometimes, this interaction can lead to increased levels of prescription medications in your body and harmful side effects. On the flip side, vitamins can also reduce levels of other prescription medications in your body and cause that medication to not work as it should.

Scientific research is lacking on many vitamins and therefore it is hard to conclude either way if a vitamin is beneficial to your health. Some have even been shown to cause harm.

Because of these things, it is important to talk with your primary care provider and/or trusted pharmacist prior to beginning any new vitamins or dietary supplements. In addition, it is a good habit to add any vitamins and herbal supplements you take to your medication list at your doctor’s office.

By Tamara Thorpe, PharmD, MBA

Adair County Health System

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.

Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.

Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 

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Colorectal Cancer RARELY Causes Symptoms

What is Colorectal Cancer?

  • Colorectal cancer is the out of control growth of cells in the colon or rectum. These cells grow into masses, or tumors.
  • Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women in the USA and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths.

Did you know…?

  • Abdominal cancers include adrenocortical tumors, carcinomas of the stomach, cancer of the pancreas, colorectal carcinomas, carcinoid tumors, and gastrointestinal stoma tumors.
  • Early screening can be lifesaving. Everyone 50 and over with Medicare are covered. If you are 40 and have a family history, ask your doctor.
  • Men and women alike get colon cancer; however, people at higher risk for developing colon cancer include those with a history of inflammatory bowel disease (including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease) and those with a family history of colon cancer.
  • The two most common inherited syndromes linked with colorectal cancer are familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as lynch syndrome. FAP is caused my mutations in the APC gene inherited from your parents.
  • Women with HNPCC have a high risk of also developing cancer of the endometrium (lining of the uterus). Other cancers linked with HNPCC include cancer of the ovary, stomach, small bowel, pancreas, kidney, brain, ureters (tubes that carry urine from the kidney to the bladder), and bile duct.
  • Screening methods include stool tests to check for blood, Sigmoidoscopy, Colonoscopy, double contrast barium enema, and CT colonography.
  • Research has shown that early detection is key. Have you had your colon cancer screening test?
  • Dr. Baccam performs colonoscopies here at ACHS. To schedule call 641-743-6189.

Written By:

Denise Grandgenett, RN

Health Coach

Adair County Health System

641-743-6189

Ext 299

 

Credits: American Cancer Society

Bets Davis, MFA

Mayo Clinic Staff

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.

Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.

Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

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Wise Health Care Consumer Month

February is Wise Health Care Consumer Month!   The primary goal of Wise Health Consumer Month is to teach people how to be more involved in their own health care. Here are some examples of how you can be a wise health care consumer and be proactive in your own health outcomes:

 

10 Tips for Being a Wise Health Care Consumer

  1. Take the time to carefully select a primary doctor or health care provider. Ask friends or relatives for recommendations. Investigate whether or not the doctor participates with your health insurance plan.
  2. Prepare for visits to your health care provider by compiling lists of questions or concerns you wish to discuss during your appointment. It is also important to let the scheduler know what you wish to talk about when you schedule your visit, so they can make sure they schedule enough time to address the issue.
  3. Get regular physical exams. The single best way to keep medical costs down is to detect health issues early- when they are generally less complicated to treat. Do not ignore symptoms.  Ignoring a medical issue now may be a signal of something more serious and could be much harder and more expensive to treat later.
  4. Be aware of when and where you should seek medical advice and what is available. Life threatening symptoms or serious injuries may require an emergency room visit. Have a milder illness or injury that needs addressed soon but do not feel you can wait to see your regular provider? Urgent Care may be an option. Urgent Care allows you to be seen the same day, without an appointment.
  5. Be aware of routine medical tests, examinations and immunizations and the recommended times to have them. You may be able to avoid unnecessary and expensive tests.
  6. Ask questions about medications you are prescribed. Understand why you are taking it and how it should be taken. Finish all medications, even if you are feeling better. Keep a checklist of all medications you are taking and share this list with your health care provider. This is especially important if you are seeing more than one doctor. This includes over the counter medication you take, such as Tylenol, allergy medications or antacids.  Some over the counter medications may have an effect or counteract with prescribed medications, or may mask a symptom that should be addressed, for example.
  7. Utilize the patient portal at your health system if possible. Many health systems now have the ability to sign up to an online system that allows you to view your lab results, office visit summaries and prescriptions, and send messages to your provider for example.
  8. Understand your health insurance plan inside and out. Know what your co-pay and deductible are, and what your cost sharing is after you have met your deductible. Often many preventative services may be covered without a copay or meeting the deductible, such as physicals and mammograms. Some services, such as outpatient or inpatient hospital visits may apply to a deductible and co-insurance and have more patient cost sharing.  A list of basic questions about what is covered and knowing the answers to these questions can save time and money.
  9. Take care of your mental health as well as you would your physical health. States of emotional upset can interfere with daily living routines and can ultimately affect your physical well-being.
  10. Keep a list of health agencies handy as a reference. Most are available by phone, email or website and can serve as a resource for free information and support. I can say from working at a public health agency – we often get calls and will gladly try to help link people to services, resources or information. (641-743-6173) You can even submit questions online at the Adair County Health System website.

 Stephanie Claussen, Community Health Coordinator

 sclaussen@adaircountyhealthsystem.org

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.  Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.  Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 

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Season Affective Disorder (SAD)

 

Could you be experiencing SAD? Seasonal Affective Disorder, also known as SAD or “The Winter Blues” is a real phenomenon. During the gray, cold days of a midwestern winter, there are those who may have no mental health issues at other times of the year, but during the winter season develop a depressed mood. There are symptoms outlined here that you or someone you know may be facing. If so, there are steps you can take to prevent those symptoms from worsening as the gray days of winter persist as the sun is in hiding. If you are having a sleep disturbance, change in appetite, social isolation, irritability, crying spells or sadness speak with your health care provider or contact the Senior Life Solutions team at 641-743-7202 for additional information and resources. Take steps to battle the Winter Blues today!

 

By Deb Theisen-Chenchar RN, BSN

Program Director of Senior Life Solutions

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.  Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.  Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.
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Shopping Local and Using Resources

I’ve always lived in this same small town.  Maybe that makes my world a little narrow but I don’t think so.  I think it makes me a conscientious member of an elite group, with concern for one another and our environment.  We see evidence of this every time something happens in our small communities, be it tragic or joyous.  We band together and help one another or celebrate together whichever the case may be.  In our everyday lives we also have the opportunity to exercise our choice to live in these wonderful communities by supporting the local businesses and services provided here.

Top 10 Reasons to Support Locally Owned Businesses

  1. Community well-being

Locally owned businesses build strong communities by sustaining town centers and social relationships.

  1. Personal Connection

Local business owners know you, and you know them.

  1. Support for non-profits

Studies have shown that local businesses donate to community causes at more than twice the rate of chains.

  1. Keeping Money in the Local Economy

Local businesses are much more likely to shop with other local businesses

  1. Jobs

Locally owned businesses create more jobs locally

  1. Local Investment

Local ownership means that decisions are made by people who live in our community and feel the impact of those decisions.

  1. Expertise

Locally owned businesses have a vested interest in serving their customers.

  1. Conserving tax dollars

Spending locally ensures that your sales taxes are reinvested where they belong – in your community!

  1. Tourism

The more interesting and unique our community, the more we will attract new neighbors, visitors and guests.  This benefits everyone!

  1. Most of all, you’ll never get a smile, a wave or a cheerful hello from a sales person at Amazon!

 

By Jane Ernst, RN

Adair County Health System

 

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Holiday Food Safety Tips

Practice food safety this holiday season as well as throughout the year.

  1. Have a plan. Consider oven space, refrigerator space and your menu. Keep hot foods 141° or higher and cold foods at 41° or below.
  2. Remember to defrost your meat in the refrigerator, under cool running water or in the microwave.
  3. Keep foods separated. Keep meats, poultry, seafood and eggs separate from all other foods in the refrigerator. This will help keep juices from the meats from dripping onto other foods.
  4. Wash your hands before, during and after food preparation.
  5. Wash all produce before using.
  6. Do not eat raw dough or batter, unless you use pasteurized eggs for dishes containing raw eggs.
  7. Cook foods to proper temperatures. Remember to reheat food to 165° or higher.
  8. Use ice to keep cold foods cold and heated elements such as a crock pot to keep hot foods hot.
  9. Refrigerate leftovers within two hours of preparation.
  • Remember to cool hot items properly. If soup or any food item is in a deep pan or dish, make sure to cool in shallow container with the lid off until cooled properly to a safe temperature of 41° or below.

Have a Healthy and Happy Holiday!

Staci Jones RD, LD

Adair County Health System

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.

Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.

Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

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Everyone Has Something To Give

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One of my favorite quotes is from Barbara Bush, “Some people give time, some money, some skills and connections, some literally their life’s blood.   But everyone has something to give.”

My entire life I have always believed this.   From a young age, I went with my Grandma and Mom to a lot of volunteer things.   At the time, I was not thrilled about spending my Saturday cooking for the Pork Producers, cleaning up at the Fairgrounds, being in the parade for the hospital and countless other things.   But looking back, I am blessed I had this opportunity.    It made me into the person I am today, and I truly believe everyone has something to give.    You don’t have to be rich to give back to the community you are in.    Even giving a smile to someone you know is having a bad day, taking time to visit your elderly neighbor or volunteering for a committee in your community can make a difference.

Being the Foundation Director at Adair County Health System, I experience first-hand how much a financial donation can help a non-profit organization.   Year after year, I see new donors and get to connect with past donors.   It is never about the donation amount, but more the thought behind the donation.   We are honored to provide quality healthcare for our rural community, but also blessed to be supported by our local rural community.    A generous community that gives their hard-earned money to be able to keep their hospital and clinic local.

What amazes me even more about the healthcare community at the hospital is that each year our own employees donate to the Adair County Health Foundation to help fund the organization.    Until I worked in healthcare, I didn’t realize this type of giving environment even existed.    This really shows what compassionate and dedicated employees we have at Adair County Health System.

I would like to challenge each and every one of you to give something back to your community this week.   Something good like a donation to non-profit, a smile, pick trash up from the park, help someone who is struggling or start volunteering with a local organization.

Tiffany Johnson

Adair County Health System

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.
Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.
Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 

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Psoriasis

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Developing a rash that doesn’t go away? Consider contacting your provider.

Psoriasis causes red, scaly, raised patches on the skin – most commonly on the outside of elbows, knees, and scalp. The exact cause is unknown; however, the immune system and genetics play a key role in developing this disease. Psoriasis is not contagious, and the skin lesions are not infectious. While you can manage symptoms of Psoriasis, there is no cure.

Signs & Symptoms:

·         Red patches of skin with thick, silvery scales

·         Itching, soreness, or burning

·         Swollen and stiff joints

·         Dry, cracked skin

·         Thickened, ridged or pitted nails

Diagnosis is made from an examination by your provider or dermatologist, sometimes a biopsy may be taken.

Treatments include:

·         Topicals – Applied to skin. Usually the first treatment option.

·         Phototherapy – Exposing the skin to ultraviolet light in a Psoriasis clinic, doctor’s office, or at home with phototherapy unit.

·         Systemics – Taken orally or by injection for moderate-severe Psoriasis

·         Biologics – Given by injection or IV infusion for moderate-severe Psoriasis

·         New oral treatments available

·         Complementary & Alternative treatments

Resources: psoriasis.org, mayclinic.org

By Aubrie  Keller, RN

Adair County Health System

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.
Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.
Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 

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Halloween Safety

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Halloween Tips

The spooky time of Halloween is just around the corner!  Here at ACMH we want our community to have a safe and fun holiday. So, here are some tips for your trick-or-treaters.

Costume safety is important. Such as, wearing appropriate fitting clothing, make sure they are the right length and size.  Another safety tip is to wear bright, reflective clothing. This is to make it easier to see drivers to see pedestrians. Masks can obstruct someone’s vision making it harder to see crossing a street, or going up a porch. Try using non-toxic face paint.

The most popular times for trick-or-treating are between the times of 5:30pm-9:30pm. If your child is under the age of 12, it is recommended that they have adult supervision. Traveling in groups is also a good idea. Also, only go to houses with the porch light that are on. If you are over the age of 12, and traveling in a group, someone having a cellphone in case of emergencies is also good.  If you see any suspicious activity going on, please do not go and find out what is happening.  Contact your local Law Enforcement or 911.

Lastly, we all know that the candy is the best part, but safe candy is just as important!  If you have any allergies, check the label on the candy to make sure that it does not contain any ingredients that you have allergies to. The next thing to check is to see if the wrapper on the candy has been tampered with. If you suspect that it has been opened or messed with, DO NOT EAT.  Throw the candy away.  Candy is good to eat, but eating a good meal before going out will help you from eating all those sweet treats. Hope you all have a spook-tacular Halloween!

By Allison Powell, CNA

Adair County Health System

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.
Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.
Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 


 

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Things To Do At Home For Common Cold

The common cold affects numerous people each year, and even the same person multiple times per year. Most colds are due to a viral infection, but the term “cold” was coined as most of these viruses occur during cold weather seasons. There are multiple strains of viruses, but Rhinovirus is the most common. You can catch these viral illnesses via air droplets. For example, if someone who is infected with a virus coughs and does not cover their mouth, you could be at risk for inhaling those infected respiratory droplets. It can also be spread by hand-to-hand contact; this is why washing your hands is the number one way to prevent viral illnesses.

Common symptoms of colds or viral illnesses include cough, runny nose, congestion, sore throat, headache, earache and even low-grade fever. Because these symptoms are viral, they are usually self-limiting but it may not always feel like that. Some things you can do to decrease your symptoms are rest, increase your fluid intake, take over the counter cough suppressants or decongestants, drink warm tea with honey or perform salt water gargles, and take Tylenol or ibuprofen for headache or body aches. Most viruses last 7-10 days. Some things you can do to prevent viral illnesses are washing your hands, avoid sharing eating utensils or cups, covering your cough or sneeze, and disinfecting surface areas/work stations.

So, when should you come to the doctor? For adults, you should seek medical care if you are experiencing symptoms longer than 10 days, fevers greater than 101.3 for 5 days or if the fever is not resolving with Tylenol or ibuprofen, shortness of breath, wheezing, or severe headache. Children should seek medical care if they have symptoms lasting greater than 7-10 days, fever greater than 101.3 for 3 or more days or fever that does not resolve with medication, wheezing, ear pain, unusual drowsiness, feeding problems or decreased urination.

Sources: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/common-cold/symptoms-causes/syc-20351605

By Jenna Evans, PA-C

Family Practice Provider,

Adair County Health System

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.
Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.
Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 

 

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