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Healthy Recipe – BBQ Chopped Pork Salad

 

BBQ Chopped Pork Salad

Ingredients

1 – 6 inch corn tortilla

Cooking Spray

2 Cups – Chopped Romaine Lettuce

3 Ounces – chopped roasted lean boneless pork

¼ Cup Roasted whole kernel corn – thawed

¼ Cup – Thinly sliced red onion

1 Tablespoon – Light sour cream

1 Tablespoon – Fat free milk

1 Tablespoon – BBQ Sauce

 

Prep: 20 minutes   Ready: 8 hours 20 minutes

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.   Cut tortilla into strips and spread on a baking sheet.   Coat with cooking spray.   Bake 5 to 7 minutes or until brown and crisp.   Cool.   Place in an air tight container.

In medium container combine lettuce, meat, corn and onion.   Cover and chill overnight.

In a small container combine the remaining ingredients.   Cover and chill overnight.

To serve add sour cream mixture to lettuce mixture toss to coat.   Top with tortilla strips.   Serve and enjoy.

 

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Personal Health Preparedness – National Preparedness Month

September is National Preparedness Month and Adair County Health System encourages everyone to prepare themselves for emergencies.  A large-scale disaster or emergency like a lengthy power outage can limit your access to supplies and services for several days or weeks. Still, nearly half do not have an emergency kit for their home.  The Centers for Disease Control lays out some basic guidelines to follow for personal health preparedness:

Personal Needs – Gather enough non-perishable food, water, personal care and hygiene, first aid and medical supplies to last at least 72 hours for everyone in your home.  Don’t forget about your pets!

Prescriptions – Prepare a 7-10 day supply of prescription medications in a waterproof container and over the counter meds such as ibuprofen or vitamins. Keep an updated list of all prescriptions and regular over the counter medications that are taken daily.   You may need a cooler or cold packs to store them in the event of a power outage.

Paperwork– Collect important documents and medical records such as insurance cards, immunization records, vital records and advanced directives and personal ID’s such as driver’s license and passports. You may need to create a care plan for your child or family member if they have special needs.  Keep copies of manuals, serial numbers for special equipment such as glucometers and nebulizers.

Power Sources– Prepare for a power outage with back-up power sources and manual equipment such as flashlights, batteries, hearing-aid batteries, car chargers, jumper cables, radio and a generator.

Practical Skills– Learn basic how-to preparedness skills such as CPR and First-Aid to protect your health and safety until help arrives.  Always call 911 first in a life-threatening emergency.

Be Informed! Follow your local emergency management and weather stations on their website or social media.  Sign up for emergency notifications for severe weather, or emergencies. Most counties have an automated alert system.   You can sign up for alerts in Adair and Guthrie County at http://entry.inspironlogistics.com/ag_ia/wens.cfm

Social Media for Adair and Guthrie County Emergency Management:

Facebook: Adair & Guthrie County EMAs

Twitter: @AdairGuthrieEMA

YouTube: Adair Guthrie EMA

Find more information:  https://www.cdc.gov/phpr/prepareyourhealth/PersonalHealth.htm

Find emergency plan templates and guides for your business or home at:  www.ready.gov

By Stephanie Claussen

ACHS Community Health Coordinator

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.
Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.
Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 

 

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What is a Clinic Referral Nurse?

When patients receive a referral from their provider for testing at another facility or to see a specialist, the referral nurse at Adair County Medical Clinics will help set up those appointments for our patients.

When necessary, the referral nurse will contact the patient’s insurance provider to ensure that the specialist is “In Network” prior to making the official referral.  This includes contacting the insurance company to get prior authorization or verifying by website before scheduling with the specialist or testing facility.  In some cases, it can take up to 16 business days for the insurance company to grant a prior authorization.  If the prior authorization for the referral is denied by the insurance company, the referral nurse will contact the insurance company again and provide further documentation or conduct a peer-to-peer phone call.  In some cases, the insurance company requests other testing before prior authorization can be granted.  An example of this would be an order for an MRI, but the insurance company requests x-rays prior to giving authorization for the MRI.

The referral nurse will also fill out any referral forms the specialist requires and send supporting records to the specialist or testing facility.  After reviewing the patient’s records, the specialist or testing facility will contact the patient to set up their appointment.

We do our best to get testing or referrals done as quickly as possible to accommodate every patient.

 

Michelle Schlicte, LPN

Referral Nurse

Adair County Medical Clinics

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider. Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement. Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 

 

 

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Aminal Bites and Rabies Exposures

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Rabies is a viral disease that can affect all warm‐blooded animals (skunks, dogs, bats, cats, cattle and even humans) and some more likely than others. In Iowa, rabies is most commonly found in skunks and bats.  Rodents, such as squirrels and mice, and rabbits very rarely get rabies. In addition, people that wake up to find a bat in the room or children that are alone with a bat in a room may have been exposed to rabies.  Bat’s teeth are so small you may not have known you were bitten.  The virus is spread when saliva containing rabies virus gets into an opening in the skin, usually by the bite of a rabid animal or if saliva from a rabid animal gets into your mucous membranes (eyes, nose, or mouth) or any open wounds.  The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death.

What should you do if an animal bites you or have a possibly exposure to rabies?

Immediately wash the wound thoroughly with soap and water. See a doctor about the wounds as soon as possible. Your doctor, possibly in consultation with the state health department, will help decide if you need treatment to prevent rabies. In addition, bite wounds can become infected and a physician will decide if you need antibiotics. You should also check with a physician about the possible need for a tetanus shot.

It is important to confirm whether or not the animal could have been rabid at the time of the bite. Detain or hold the animal ONLY if it can be done safely.  Note what the animal looks like and the location of the animal. Call for help and report this information to your local county health department, an animal control officer or local law enforcement.   A 10-day confinement might be ordered for domestic healthy animals to observe for rabies symptoms.  If the animal is not vaccinated it may be required to be kenneled at a vet or shelter so it can be closely monitored.  Rabies testing cannot be done on a live animal.  Wild or unhealthy animals suspected of rabies may be euthanized and sent on for brain matter testing by a vet.

What can you do to prevent rabies exposures?

  • · Vaccinate your dogs and cats, as well as valuable livestock and keep them up to date.  Rabies vaccines can last up to three years depending on the vaccine used. Vaccinating our pets creates a barrier between rabies in the wild and people.

  • · Spay and neuter your pets.  This helps keep the unwanted and stray animal population down.  Stray animals are at higher risk for rabies exposures from wild animals.

  • · Rabies exposures can lead to thousands of dollars in medical care and follow up treatment. Not to mention the physical and emotional toll that can result from animal bites. It is well worth the cost of rabies vaccines to prevent this from happening to someone.

Bite Prevention

  • · Do not approach or try to handle animals, including dogs and cats that you do not know.  Animal bites increase in the warmer months as animals and people are more likely to be outside.
  • · Do not touch sick or injured animals. Call and report them to an animal control officer or local law enforcement.
  • · Do not let your pets roam; keep them restrained. Train and socialize them so they are calm around people.
  • · Educate children about bite prevention. Children are the most common victims of severe dog bites.

For more information visit https://www.idph.iowa.gov/rabies or https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/

By Stephanie Claussen

ACHS Community Health Coordinator

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.
Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.
Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.


 

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Vitamins – What You Need To Know

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By Tamara Thorpe, PharmD, MBA

Vitamins are regulated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a dietary supplement. However, the FDA does not require that manufacturers of the vitamins prove safety and effectiveness before marketing a dietary supplement the way they do for a prescription medication. In addition, the FDA does not evaluate dietary supplements for the treatment of medical conditions. Due to the lack of oversight of vitamins and dietary supplements, there are many things to be careful with. Just because a product is available as over the counter, meaning no prescription is needed, it is not necessarily safe for everyone to use.

Multivitamins and specific vitamin containing products do provide benefit for certain individuals, but many healthy, non-pregnant adults get all of the nutrients they need from a well-balanced diet. Vitamin supplements are not intended for use by everyone. Some people that specifically benefit from multivitamins are vegetarians or vegans, those with poor nutritional status, and people with nonhealing wounds. Many children and adults living in Iowa do not get enough vitamin D and may require this vitamin supplement. Folic acid supplementation is beneficial for pregnancy and preconception.

Many vitamins and dietary supplements interact with prescription medications. Sometimes, this interaction can lead to increased levels of prescription medications in your body and harmful side effects. On the flip side, vitamins can also reduce levels of other prescription medications in your body and cause that medication to not work as it should.

Scientific research is lacking on many vitamins and therefore it is hard to conclude either way if a vitamin is beneficial to your health. Some have even been shown to cause harm.

Because of these things, it is important to talk with your primary care provider and/or trusted pharmacist prior to beginning any new vitamins or dietary supplements. In addition, it is a good habit to add any vitamins and herbal supplements you take to your medication list at your doctor’s office.

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider. Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement. Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.


 

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Importance of Prenatal Care

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Pregnancy can be filled with joy and wonder as well as concerns and fears. It is important for the mother to take care of herself and her baby with prenatal care.

Most pregnant women are otherwise healthy and prenatal care is intended to monitor the baby’s growth and the mother’s well-being. Any concerns or prior health conditions will be carefully managed with both the mother’s and the baby’s health in mind.

Prenatal visits

After becoming pregnant, the initial prenatal visit should be schedule between the 10th and 12th week.  If you are unsure of date of conception, see you doctor to confirm pregnancy. The first initial prenatal visit covers medical history, how the mother is feeling, basic information such as weight and blood pressure, a physical exam including a pelvic exam to check the size and shape of the uterus, and a Pap smear to check for any abnormalities of the cervix.

Urine and blood tests will be taken during the first visit.  Discussion about genetic screening options typically take place at this visit also.  Future visits include tests to check for diabetes of pregnancy, anemia, preeclampsia, high blood pressure (gestational hypertension), and vaginal group B strep infection.   Recommended immunizations will also be discussed.   Urine tests are typically performed at each visit to check for sugar and protein.

5 Benefits of Prenatal Care

1. Mom’s and Baby’s health depends on it. While most pregnancies proceed normally, (after all, women’s bodies were designed to be pregnant and give birth), prenatal visits can detect potential health concerns and pregnancy complications, such as anemia, gestational diabetes, high blood pressure, or pre-eclampsia.  These are best managed when caught early.

2. Receive accurate nutritional information. Your diet may have to go through some changes in order to meet the nutritional needs of your baby. You will be given specific information about the recommended daily intake for the next nine months, including what you should not eat. Some of the most common foods, like lunch meats and hot dogs, will have to be avoided or thoroughly heated before consuming. Contrary to popular belief, pregnancy doesn’t mean you get to eat for two (sorry!). In fact, for a single baby you only need about 300 extra calories per day.  All of this information – and more – will be provided at your prenatal appointments.

3. Monitor baby’s development. Your baby’s growth is a major indicator of how well he or she is doing.  Growth is measured by palpating, or feeling, for the top of the uterus and then measuring from the pubic bone to the top of the uterus.  Fetal heart rate is also obtained at every visit.  Modern technology will assist as well. Ultrasounds will be strategically timed to verify your baby’s development and can identify gender.

4. Schedule appropriate testing. Depending on your age, medical history, and family history certain tests may be recommended. For example, genetic screening can be obtained by blood work to look for genetic conditions such as Down Syndrome.  This helps your care team have more information and be best prepared at delivery.  Other tests will be to determine your blood type and if you would need Rhogam to prevent possible complications.  Other testing will be matched to your specific needs based on medical history.

5. Learn about pregnancy, labor and delivery. Prenatal visits offer you the chance to discuss labor and delivery, potential scenarios, questions and concerns with your doctor. This includes learning about the risks and benefits of every intervention or treatment available.  This information will help you and your partner develop a birthing plan that is the right fit.

By Jessica Kennedy, DO
Family Practice Provider
Adair County Health System
The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider. Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement. Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.


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A Clinic Triage Nurse

Do you ever have a question about your health that you are not sure what to do about? Or are you feeling ill and not sure when to see your provider?  These are great times to talk to your clinic triage nurse.

The clinic triage nurse will help you with general questions about your health and help determine the type of care you may need.  Whether you are in the clinic or call in, the triage nurse can help you decide what needs to be done and provide another line of communication between you and your health care provider.  The nurse will gather the needed information by listening and discussing your symptoms. This helps determine the best course of action whether it be to come to the clinic and see your provider, monitor your symptoms, or be seen in the emergency room.   Providing enough information to the triage nurse gives your provider the opportunity to make the best decision with you for your healthcare needs.

If you have another question after an appointment that you forgot to ask, need to clarify instructions, or miss a call from your provider or their nurse/medical assistant and don’t want to “play phone tag” to get the information?  No problem! Call the clinic triage nurse.  Your provider and their nurse/medical assistant work hard to be available for their patients, but we know the clinic can be a busy place.  It can be hard to reach them by phone at times.  When you call to the clinic, you can talk with the triage nurse and they may be able to give you the information at that time.  If the triage nurse is unable to answer a question, they can relay the question to your provider and sometimes reduce the wait time on responses back to you.

Overall the triage nurse is there to assess a situation, give advice as appropriate, and assist your provider in making sure that as a patient you are getting the best care option available.

Written by:
Paige Clayton, RN
Adair County Medical Clinic – Triage Nurse

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.
Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement. Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 

 

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Safe Summer Fun

Summer fun is in full swing!

With county fairs going on and the state fair going on most people will likely be spending more time with friends and family outside. Following are some tips to be mindful of for heat/sun related illnesses.
Here are a few prevention tips:
Stay Cool:  avoid direct sunlight, find shady or air conditioned shelters, wear lightweight light colored clothing
Stay Hydrated: drink more water than usual, avoid alcohol or drinks containing large amounts of sugar
Wear Sunscreen: use SPF 30 or higher broad spectrum sunscreen with water resistance, apply and reapply according to the directions on the bottle

Here is a good example from the Center of Disease (CDC) on how to spot signs/symptoms of heat/sun related illnesses and what to for them:

 

Make sure not to forget your furry four legged friend too!

Wendy Seddon, CNA
Adair County Health System

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.  Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement. Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.

 

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Steps to Healthy Swimming: Protection against Recreational Water Illnesses (RWIs)

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You can choose to swim healthy! You have the power to help keep germs out the water in places we swim in the first place. Remember, chlorine and other disinfectants don’t kill germs instantly. Additionally, the mixing of chlorine with pee and sweat uses up the chlorine in the pool, which would otherwise kill germs.

We all share the water we swim in, and each of us needs to do our part to help keep ourselves, our families and our friends healthy. To help protect yourself and other swimmers from germs, here are a few easy and effective steps all swimmers can take each time we swim:

Keep the pee, poop, sweat, and dirt out of the water!

·         Stay out of the water if you have diarrhea.

·         Shower before you get in the water.

·         Don’t pee or poop in the water.

·         Don’t swallow the water.

Every hour—everyone out!

·         Take kids on bathroom breaks.

·         Check diapers and change them in a bathroom or diaper-changing area–not poolside–to keep germs away from the pool.

·         Reapply sunscreen.

·         Drink plenty of fluids.

Check the free chlorine level and pH before getting into the water.

·         Pools: Proper free chlorine level (1–3 mg/L or parts per million [ppm]) and pH (7.2–7.8) maximize germ-killing power.

·         Hot tubs/spas: Proper disinfectant level (chlorine [2–4 parts per million or ppm] or bromine [4–6 ppm] and pH [7.2–7.8]) maximize germ-killing power.

·         Most superstores, hardware stores, and pool-supply stores sell pool test strips.

 

Think Healthy. Swim Healthy. Be Healthy!

 

By Jane Ernst, RN

Adair County Public Health Director

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.
Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.
Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.


 

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Mental Health in Rural Iowa

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Mental Health in Rural Iowa

Mental disorders/health concerns have been recognized as a major rural health priority.

At the least, 50% of the world’s population will be impacted by a mental disorder.

Mental Health…

involves effective functioning in daily activities resulting in

  • Productive activities (work, school, caregiving)
  • Healthy relationships
  • Ability to adapt to change and cope with adversity

Mental Illness…

refers collectively to all diagnosable mental disorders – health conditions involving:

  • Significant changes in thinking, emotion and/or behavior
  • Distress and/or problems functioning in social, work or family activities

Mental health is the foundation for thinking, communication, learning, resilience and self-esteem. Mental health is also key to relationships, personal and emotional well-being and contributing to community or society.

Mental disorders include three major categories of mental illness:

1. Schizophrenia

2. Affective disorders (Example: major depression and manic-depressive illness)

3. Anxiety disorders (panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and phobia)

Anxiety disorders (panic disorder, obsessive-

When compared to other chronic medical conditions/disease, individuals in their teens and mid-twenties see an earlier onset of mental disorders.

When comparing rural and urban use of outpatient mental health services, rural usage is considerably lower.

Rural areas are most lacking in meeting the needs of children afflicted with serious mental health problems because of the relative scarcity of child psychiatrists/specialists.

Having more than one mental disorder is a major risk factor for suicide. A Pertinent example is having major depression combined with alcohol abuse.

Having depression, anxiety, and many other psychosocial factors are contributing to the advancement and outcomes associated with chronic illnesses, like cancer and heart disease.

Physicians who practice in rural areas are playing a larger role in mental health care than their urban colleagues.  This is likely attributed to the shortage of mental health specialists and the stigma-associated reluctance of seeing a mental health professional.

ACHS is making your mental health a priority.  Contact a provider for assistance.

~ David Black, PA-C – Adair County Health System

The information provided on the Adair County Health System’s Blog is not a substitute for professional medical advice and care. If you have specific needs, please see a professional health care provider.

Any references to products, services, or health care providers on this web site are not a recommendation or endorsement of products, services or providers. Links to other Web sites from this site are provided for convenience and do not constitute or imply endorsement.

Effort is taken to insure accurate information, however we cannot guarantee completeness or timeliness.


References:
1. Robins, L.N., and Regier, D.A. Psychiatric disorders in America: The epidemiologic catchment area study. New York, NY: Free Press, 1991
2. https://www.psychiatry.org/copyright
3. Mental health and mental disorders—a… (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/255683562_Mental_health_and_mental_disorders-a_rural_challenge_A_literature_review.
4. Kessler, R.C.; Costello, E.J.; Merikangas, K.R.; et al. Section 2: Chapter 5: Psychiatric epidemiology: Recent advances and future directions. Mental Health, United States, 2000. Washington DC: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office, 2001, 29-42.
5. Rost, K.; Owen, R.R.; Smith, J.; et al. Rural-urban differences in service use and course of illness in bipolar disorder. Journal of Rural Health 14(1):36-43, 1998.
6. Lambert, D.; Agger, M.S.; and Hartley, D. Service use of rural and urban Medicaid
beneficiaries suffering from depression: The role of supply. Journal of Rural Health15(3):344-355, 1999.
7. Lambert, D., and Agger, M.S. Access of rural AFDC Medicaid beneficiaries to mental health services. Health Care Finance Review 17(1):133-145, 1995.
8. Sullivan, G.; Jackson, C.A.; and Spritzer, K. Characteristics and service use of seriously mentally ill persons living in rural areas. Psychiatric Services 47(1):57-61, 1996.
9. Holzer, C.E.; Goldsmith, H.F. and Ciarlo, J.A.Chapter 16: Effects of rural-urban county type on the availability of health and mental health care  providers. Mental Health, United States.DHHS Pub. No. (SMA)99-3285. Washington, DC: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1998, 204-213.
10. Henriksson, M.M.; Aro, H.M.; Marttunen, M.J.; et al. Mental disorders and comorbidity in suicide. American Journal of Psychiatry 150(6):935-940, 1993.
11. Cornelius, J.R.; Salloum, I.M.; Mezzich, J.; et al. Disproportionate suicidality in patients with comorbid major depression and alcoholism. American Journal of Psychiatry152(3):358-364, 1995.
12. Schneiderman, N.; Antoni, M.H.; Saab, P.G.; et al. Health psychology: Psychosocial and biobehavioral aspects of chronic disease management. Annual Review of Psychology 52: 555-580, 2001
13. Geller, J.M. Rural primary care providers’ perceptions of their roles in the provision of mental 110Rural Healthy People 2010 health services: Voices from the plains. Journal of Rural Health15(3):326-334, 1999.
14. Wagenfeld, M.O.; Murray, J.D.; Mohatt, D.F.; et al. Mental health and rural America: 1980-1993. An  overview and annotated bibliography. Washington, DC: Health and Human Services Administration, Office of Rural Health Policy, 1994, 1-116
15.  Haley, W.E.; McDaniel, S.H.; Bray, J.H.; et al. Psychological practice in primary care settings: Practical tips for clinicians. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice29(3):237-244, 1998.
16. Rost, K.; Smith, G.R.; and Taylor, J.L. Rural-urban differences in stigma and the use of care for depressive disorders. Journal of Rural Health
9(1):57-62, 1993.

 

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